Hot answers tagged

13

This is a tough question, but it only has one answer: If the question is about Christian beliefs and practices then it is on topic and will not be closed. Or, at least, it can't be closed because some may find the question or prospective answers offensive. Finding questions and answers offensive is not a problem unique to you or even the LDS. There's ...


11

No, it is not. But the reason it is not is not that they are fringe beliefs, it is that they are personal and don't answer any questions of the form this site is built around. This site asks for the beliefs of various Christian groups. It is not a place for airing out new ideas, developing theology, evangelizing, or otherwise soap-boxing anything. The ...


11

All such questions are acceptable here. To ban them would be censorship. But when a topic is sensitive it should be asked about with care. No one is under compulsion to answer any question here, but likewise, no one is under compulsion not to answer. If someone who has the knowledge desires to answer such questions, perhaps because they have left those ...


9

The Premise: We do not do new theology here This is 100% the case as far as I am concerned. Trying to do new theology fails here for several reasons: Truth Questions are off-topic. Any question that is trying to ascertain whether or not a theological position is "right" is already suspect. In presenting a question in the form "Here is a ...


9

My vote goes to "No way!". If a question asks in the title: "Does the wine and wafer truly become the blood and body of Christ" and the body of the question asks, Is it true that the wine and wafer in holy Communion actually become the body of Christ? It's a Truth question. Adding "Catholicism" to the tag is absolutely not sufficient to turn it ...


9

TLDR; Yes, standards have changed. More specifically, I see two distinct things that have changed: Biblical Hermeneutics launched as a sister site. Many of the "What does verse X mean?" questions are now better suited for this site, which delves into the textual context, translation nuänces, etc, of scripture. They strictly do not address interpretation ...


9

Like any label, church fathers is imprecise, but I'd argue that it's more precise than some of the others you called out ("conservative," "notable," etc.). To me the Wikipedia definition is pretty straight forward: Christian theologians from the 7th century or earlier whose writings significantly affected orthodox Christianity. Such a definition might seem ...


8

It's because this isn't a site about "what does the Bible say?" but rather about "what do Christians believe?" That may seem like an insignificant difference, but when you consider the literally thousands of different Christian churches, each with their own way of interpreting many of the same Bible verses, it becomes very significant indeed!


8

In short, because people disagree about what the Bible says. So rather than asking "What does the Bible say?" we ask "What does the Catholic church think the Bible says about this topic?" or "How do Protestants interpret this passage?" It may help to think of this site as primarily documenting (through questions and answers) the beliefs and practices of ...


8

Short answer: it depends. In particular, the traditions/denominations that are helpful to know about depend on the topic of your question. As in most cases, Wikipedia is a great place to start. There's a "Major denominations" section of its Christianity article that provides a brief overview of beliefs. Some of these major denominations are more ...


7

We have many other questions about Christian language, such as the phrase tag, and other questions such as these: Is there any substantive difference between the verbal reference "second Corinthians" and "two Corinthians"? Why do some Christians use a period instead of a colon in verse references? What might the capitalization of the ...


7

Scoping can be done in any part of a question. When considering what the scope of a question is all parts should be taken into account: the site it is on, the title, the body and the tags.1 If the body spells out a direction for inquiry and limits to the result set that surely counts as valid scoping. That being said there are good reasons to encourage ...


7

I think you provided your own answer: In that particular case, I probably should just put in more research effort to properly restrict the question. If you don't know which denomination to ask about, you probably need to do a bit more research. That doesn't mean that an open-ended question is inherently bad... but it's not a good fit for our site, where ...


6

I rise to speak in defense of the biblical-basis tag. I love those questions, and I find them to be the most valuable for me. Historically, "Scripture" has been the first of the "sources of theology," and from my evangelical background, the most important. Likewise, when I do theology, while I may find it interesting what certain denominations hold, it is ...


6

The general rule is to make sure you answer the question actually asked. To give one example, I once asked a question about whether the Roman Catholic Church considers angels to be saints, and, if so, in what sense. One of the answers began with the sentence “I don't agree at all with canonization”. I can see why the person said that. They saw this as an ...


6

This site is about what groups of Christians believe, not individual opinions. We have established consensus around What is the minimum bar for a "group" (sect / denomination / etc..)? We specifically do not do new theology here - we only seek to understand extant theology. We are more akin to a seminary than a church - this is an academic ...


6

Scoping in question bodies should be considered legitimate, but as much as possible scoping should be included in the title. Scoping should generally be included in the question title. However, there is also value in brief, punchy question titles. Thus, in some cases, it may be best for some scoping to be done only in the question body. In such (limited) ...


6

Is this okay with everyone? No, it is not okay. Just because it's tagged biblical-basis does not exempt answers from following the same scoping rules we do across the site. You may not post a contrary view to whatever doctrine is being questions. Just like a question that asks "What do Catholics believe about X?" must be answered from a Catholic ...


6

Tagging is to help find and sort questions - they should apply to the context of the question, questions themselves still have to have all the context in them. So, if I tag a question virgin-mary the question has to be about the Blessed Virgin Mary. That's easy. If I tag a question catholicism the question has to be about Catholicism, not just expected ...


6

General philosophy questions aren't on topic here. Historical or theological philosophy questions can be. Here are some examples: What influence did Greek philosophy have on the formation of orthodox Christian doctrine? What influence did Greco-Roman philosophy have on the doctrine of "creatio ex nihilo"? What is the relation between the Logos of ...


5

Your personal convictions are completely irrelevant, but your answers must match the perspectives asked about. If what you want to write disagrees with the premise of the question, you can't post it as an answer. Sometimes it is appropriate to challenge a question in a comment, such as saying "actually the Catholic Church doesn't believe X, as shown in the ...


5

I don't know why your flag was declined; perhaps he can offer an explanation. That said, I just locked it as having historical significance. That question dates from the earliest days of this site, and would (or rather, should) definitely not fly today. So, now it is effectively closed.


5

I'm going to reassert the position that there's nothing wrong with "Is there a Biblical basis for believing X?" it's a completely different thing from asking "Does the Bible teach that X is true?" Take the following: Q: Is there a Biblical basis for believing that the earth is only roughly 6000 years old or so? A: Why yes, there is, if you take ...


5

Yes, this site allows these types of questions to be asked and answered. If it is a fact that certain groups that self-identify as Christians do (or don't) have secret practices and rituals that they'd rather not talk about with outsiders, asking and answering questions about those secret practices and rituals is still a factual question about a Christian ...


4

Let's start with a dictionary definition. The one we use when we talk about scope is the following: extent or range of view, outlook, application, operation, effectiveness, So what does that mean here? When we talk about question scope, we are talking about two main things. The first is what is the topic of the post. IE what is the question, and what are ...


4

My answer is in general agreement with Curiousdannii's answer, but I disagree on some particulars. It also has some overlap with Dick Harfield's and Fredsbend's, but I think it stakes out an ultimately different approach from all of the other answers. As with many (or even all?) scopes, it depends on the context. Some questions can be scoped to a particular ...


4

I think tagging is sufficient. But barely. It's quite common on many sites for one person to respond to a question, taking tags into account, and another person responds with "Why do you assume they're using Emacs?" or "How do you know they're talking about France?" or "How do you know they're asking about Baptists?" Or whatever, with the response to be "it'...


4

The problem I have with most "what are the differences between X and Y religions?" questions is the problem imposed by Stack Exchange's one-question-one-correct-answer model. This isn't a discussion forum. Therefore, to ideally answer such a question an expert in both X and Y religions would need to provide the answer. Now, we do the best we can, and the ...


4

Many Protestants agree with you and in a perfect world you'd be right. The problem is twofold though: A person of a given denomination asking a question can't always know ahead of time whether their question is generic enough to be answered by anyone Some denominations teach that they are the only sure interpreter of the Bible, therefore if you ask a ...


3

One important thing to keep in mind is the authors intent is the main thing to consider. Being blatantly wrong isn't a valid reason to delete according to the Stack Exchange model. for example, if someone asks for the Catholic perspective on original sin and someone answers "I heard it is blah blah" and doesn't cite any sources that is a poor answer in ...


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