Hot answers tagged

40

I've come to understand what is and isn't acceptable in a way that can be expressed in two images. In one, I picture a seeker, maybe coming to their Pastor or Priest, or maybe climbing a mountain to ask a guru the secret of life, or hoping the heavens will open up and divinely reveal absolute truth. In the second picture, I see a giant person peering into ...


16

Christianity.SE is all about asking genuine questions about Scripture, Tradition, and Practice of Christianity in all it's forms. It's about being able to show off when you know what the right answer is, proving it using any or all of the traditional four sources of theology, and perhaps most importantly presenting it in a clear, convincing fashion. It is ...


14

One of the areas that I've felt we are particularly lacking is good answers to questions from specific minority opinions/sects in Christianity. Specifically getting regular users/contributors from those sects to come and constructively participate. The biggest one of these minorities is the Jehovah's Witnesses. For whatever reason (and this is a general ...


13

This is a tough question, but it only has one answer: If the question is about Christian beliefs and practices then it is on topic and will not be closed. Or, at least, it can't be closed because some may find the question or prospective answers offensive. Finding questions and answers offensive is not a problem unique to you or even the LDS. There's ...


11

No, it is not. But the reason it is not is not that they are fringe beliefs, it is that they are personal and don't answer any questions of the form this site is built around. This site asks for the beliefs of various Christian groups. It is not a place for airing out new ideas, developing theology, evangelizing, or otherwise soap-boxing anything. The ...


11

I actually sort of like the question. On politics, we have something similar, "I believe in issues X, Y, and Z, what political party should I be a member of?" What I like in both cases is that there is a good pedagogical point. It is a manageable shorthand for "What do X people believe?" which is clearly on topic. It is no more exhaustive than the question, ...


11

All such questions are acceptable here. To ban them would be censorship. But when a topic is sensitive it should be asked about with care. No one is under compulsion to answer any question here, but likewise, no one is under compulsion not to answer. If someone who has the knowledge desires to answer such questions, perhaps because they have left those ...


10

I think Biblical-Basis should stand on its own. (Correct me if I'm wrong here.) From what I understand, the issue of looking for something from a denominational perspective stems from the fact that we must, absolutely, keep the questions answerable, objectively, and definitively. We do not want our answers to devolve into a war of opinions where the most ...


9

The Premise: We do not do new theology here This is 100% the case as far as I am concerned. Trying to do new theology fails here for several reasons: Truth Questions are off-topic. Any question that is trying to ascertain whether or not a theological position is "right" is already suspect. In presenting a question in the form "Here is a ...


9

My vote goes to "No way!". If a question asks in the title: "Does the wine and wafer truly become the blood and body of Christ" and the body of the question asks, Is it true that the wine and wafer in holy Communion actually become the body of Christ? It's a Truth question. Adding "Catholicism" to the tag is absolutely not sufficient to turn it ...


9

Like any label, church fathers is imprecise, but I'd argue that it's more precise than some of the others you called out ("conservative," "notable," etc.). To me the Wikipedia definition is pretty straight forward: Christian theologians from the 7th century or earlier whose writings significantly affected orthodox Christianity. Such a definition might seem ...


9

TLDR; Yes, standards have changed. More specifically, I see two distinct things that have changed: Biblical Hermeneutics launched as a sister site. Many of the "What does verse X mean?" questions are now better suited for this site, which delves into the textual context, translation nuänces, etc, of scripture. They strictly do not address interpretation ...


8

It's because this isn't a site about "what does the Bible say?" but rather about "what do Christians believe?" That may seem like an insignificant difference, but when you consider the literally thousands of different Christian churches, each with their own way of interpreting many of the same Bible verses, it becomes very significant indeed!


8

In short, because people disagree about what the Bible says. So rather than asking "What does the Bible say?" we ask "What does the Catholic church think the Bible says about this topic?" or "How do Protestants interpret this passage?" It may help to think of this site as primarily documenting (through questions and answers) the beliefs and practices of ...


8

Short answer: it depends. In particular, the traditions/denominations that are helpful to know about depend on the topic of your question. As in most cases, Wikipedia is a great place to start. There's a "Major denominations" section of its Christianity article that provides a brief overview of beliefs. Some of these major denominations are more ...


7

I think you provided your own answer: In that particular case, I probably should just put in more research effort to properly restrict the question. If you don't know which denomination to ask about, you probably need to do a bit more research. That doesn't mean that an open-ended question is inherently bad... but it's not a good fit for our site, where ...


7

"What you should do is choose is A," is bad form. "Your X rules out B-like denominations, your Y rules out C&D-like denoms, etc." could be a good answer.


7

Scoping can be done in any part of a question. When considering what the scope of a question is all parts should be taken into account: the site it is on, the title, the body and the tags.1 If the body spells out a direction for inquiry and limits to the result set that surely counts as valid scoping. That being said there are good reasons to encourage ...


7

We have many other questions about Christian language, such as the phrase tag, and other questions such as these: Is there any substantive difference between the verbal reference "second Corinthians" and "two Corinthians"? Why do some Christians use a period instead of a colon in verse references? What might the capitalization of the ...


6

I am personally not a fan of making (or voting on) recommendations to and from complete strangers, especially in matters I actually care about. The question is basically "what denomination teaches X, Y, and Z?" which is on topic; if there's a problem with the personal wording of the question it can be edited to fit that format.


6

I rise to speak in defense of the biblical-basis tag. I love those questions, and I find them to be the most valuable for me. Historically, "Scripture" has been the first of the "sources of theology," and from my evangelical background, the most important. Likewise, when I do theology, while I may find it interesting what certain denominations hold, it is ...


6

This site is about what groups of Christians believe, not individual opinions. We have established consensus around What is the minimum bar for a "group" (sect / denomination / etc..)? We specifically do not do new theology here - we only seek to understand extant theology. We are more akin to a seminary than a church - this is an academic ...


6

Scoping in question bodies should be considered legitimate, but as much as possible scoping should be included in the title. Scoping should generally be included in the question title. However, there is also value in brief, punchy question titles. Thus, in some cases, it may be best for some scoping to be done only in the question body. In such (limited) ...


6

The general rule is to make sure you answer the question actually asked. To give one example, I once asked a question about whether the Roman Catholic Church considers angels to be saints, and, if so, in what sense. One of the answers began with the sentence “I don't agree at all with canonization”. I can see why the person said that. They saw this as an ...


6

Is this okay with everyone? No, it is not okay. Just because it's tagged biblical-basis does not exempt answers from following the same scoping rules we do across the site. You may not post a contrary view to whatever doctrine is being questions. Just like a question that asks "What do Catholics believe about X?" must be answered from a Catholic ...


6

Tagging is to help find and sort questions - they should apply to the context of the question, questions themselves still have to have all the context in them. So, if I tag a question virgin-mary the question has to be about the Blessed Virgin Mary. That's easy. If I tag a question catholicism the question has to be about Catholicism, not just expected ...


5

I don't know why your flag was declined; perhaps he can offer an explanation. That said, I just locked it as having historical significance. That question dates from the earliest days of this site, and would (or rather, should) definitely not fly today. So, now it is effectively closed.


5

I'm going to reassert the position that there's nothing wrong with "Is there a Biblical basis for believing X?" it's a completely different thing from asking "Does the Bible teach that X is true?" Take the following: Q: Is there a Biblical basis for believing that the earth is only roughly 6000 years old or so? A: Why yes, there is, if you take ...


5

Your personal convictions are completely irrelevant, but your answers must match the perspectives asked about. If what you want to write disagrees with the premise of the question, you can't post it as an answer. Sometimes it is appropriate to challenge a question in a comment, such as saying "actually the Catholic Church doesn't believe X, as shown in the ...


5

Yes, this site allows these types of questions to be asked and answered. If it is a fact that certain groups that self-identify as Christians do (or don't) have secret practices and rituals that they'd rather not talk about with outsiders, asking and answering questions about those secret practices and rituals is still a factual question about a Christian ...


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