7

It was off-topic (opinion-based), and not likely to be salvageable. Even after the edit, it was begging for opinion. It was deleted as many such questions are. If you want your questions to remain on the site, you need to ask questions that are on-topic. Here are some links to help you figure out how to do that. I recommend reading them instead of ...


7

If you think they are cluttering the home page, you have a couple of options. If they really are very bad, flag them for deletion. We don't like to delete questions outright for a few reasons I'll get to later, but if it's already closed and heavily downvoted sometimes we'll short circuit the automatic and community processes that area already in place. If ...


6

Good news! There is already a means you have at your disposal to do what you what. If you flag an item as <>Very Low Quality, you will see it says, This question has severe formatting or content problems. This question is unlikely to be salvageable through editing, and might need to be removed. As Paul states, bad formatting alone isn't enough to ...


6

Deleted posts aren't actually removed from the system. Deleting posts causes them to be hidden from most users and freezes new voting and comments, but the posts are still there and there are a number of things that can be done with them. Moderators can still comment. Sometimes this is useful when for whatever reason a post is removed for not fitting the ...


5

It has been the procedure of this SE to not delete questions but to leave them exist but on hold as to not have repetitive questions. No it has not been, nor is it. Questions being put on hold (for any reason other than duplicate) is the start of the pathway to deletion. We don't do it right away because we want to give people an oportunity to edit them ...


4

We need to close more questions via community moderation ... ... and find out who will willingly and positively engage with the community here to get the questions in to stackable shape, and answers into stackable shape. One thing I learned eventually on SEs: bad questions attract bad answers. ... and then reopen the ones that do get recrafted into ...


4

I can see the difficulty in trying to deal with answer posts that have been flagged, given the lack of moderators who actively monitor what’s going on. However, would it be helpful if participators paid more attention to questions that fall foul of the “rules” (such as inviting opinions or making claims that are not backed up by evidence) and down-voted ...


3

I understand the appeal of a historical lock, but I'm not sure that it's a good solution in most cases. To ensure we're on the same page, here's the functional definition of historical locks, as I see it: Historical locking adds a new post notice emphasizing that the post is not a good fit for the site, but does not say why. We shouldn't necessarily ...


3

For better or worse, one of the main ways this site gets traffic is through old, off-topic questions appearing in search engine results. This is great because more people are exposed to the site. At the same time, it's bad because these questions can give the wrong impression about what kind of site this is. This particular question, Was Catholicism the ...


2

On https://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/6635/was-george-w-bush-a-prophet, I wonder if we could edit that into a decent question (with the extant answer) by changing it to: "What differentiates a prophet from any person who 'hears from God'?" As an example, George W. Bush...


2

I'll acknowledge up front that I don't know the full background or current conventions to historical locks, but this is my intuitive sense of how they should be used. I see historical locks as a subset of normal locks, and therefore shouldn't really have wildly distinct criteria. Normal locks are intended to be time limited, historical locks are expected ...


1

I'm going to keep my suggestion very short and sweet: The verbiage of the historical lock is a guide as to where to use it. Particularly, it is useful on very old posts that have 10+ (give or take) up-votes, but are so off-topic that they wouldn't last a day by current standards. The benefit of a historical lock is that is explicitly tells the newcomers ...


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