Hot answers tagged

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Update As of October 5, 2015, the penalty for Christianity on the Network Hot Questions has been removed. Well, there's a reason for this. The hot network questions algorithm includes adjustments based on feedback such as: I shouldn't have to see a bible study on Stack Overflow. Therefore, Christianity questions must score higher in order to be displayed on ...


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Yes. We have an issue with answer length. Most of the time answers are not long enough. There is a reason that one of hte major factors in Stack Exchange's quality filter is post length. We want answers that go above and beyond what is asked for in the question and are detailed. Stack Exchange is supposed to be a place for experts to ask and answer ...


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The core criteria for writing answers on the Stack Exchange model, not only on this site but across the entire network, is one of usefulness; this can be reflected simply by hovering over the vote buttons on the side of every post: Usefulness, unfortunately, is highly subjective. Unlike our progenitor Stack Overflow, where something merely needs to be ...


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Good answers to a subjective questions on practical matters should still manage to draw from the four traditional sources of theology. Good answers should consist of any or all of the following: Scripture - Reference to common scriptures that address the practical situation at hand. (e.g. If someone asks, "When the pastor seems to have made an ...


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tl;dr> Yes and No. Yes, it is helpful when answers specify the tradition, but no, we don't want those kinds of questions in the first place. Ideally, the question is going to be scoped to a particular theological framework. Answers that match are valid, answers that don't aren't. Getting all possible answers is often too broad and cumbersome, and not well ...


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Here's my mental flow chart: Am I excited about writing an answer in my own words? Yes? Then write my own answer and acknowledge the overlaps either in a comment or somewhere inconspicuous in your answer. No? Can I reference my additions in a comment? Yes? Simply comment and optionally offer to edit in the additions if the author cares to include them. ...


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The way things are around here right now yes, your observations are an acceptable way to answer a question like that. In general, our policy does not actually demand references, what it does require is that any assertions made could be referenced in theory or if challenged. Quite often an expert will make a statement about the beliefs of a certain tradition ...


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I already do delete answers to pastor advice questions (and comments that attempt to address the issue rather than redirect to real counsel) on sight. But I don't see everything, no even do all the mods put together. If you run across these, feel free to flag answers on such questions with a quick custom reason such as "flush answers on pastoral advice ...


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There are many examples of great answers on this site that don't fully quote every verse they reference, like this one and this one. What makes these generally acceptable? The unquoted verse citations are used as references to support a point being made in the answer. That is, the citation is tangential to the argument, and is there only to make it more ...


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You are asking the wrong question. CSE has no official doctrinal policy. There is as much (in my observation maybe more) room here for heresy than orthodoxy. As such asking whether holding YEC views is an official policy is simply the wrong question, it's just not relevant. The issue here is question scope, and how we use each of the tools provided by the ...


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It is always acceptable to tackle and show the error in false assumptions. In you example, the false assumption is that Baptists must obey the Levitical law. Your answer corrects that. However, questions with seriously obvious false assumptions tend to get closed on this site anyway. You example question, for example, is, well, a dumb question. I would vote ...


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It depends on the type of question. Most of the time it is okay IMO. The question you linked to asks How is this inconsistency explained by theologians of the various major denominations of Christianity, especially the ones that believe in Biblical inerrancy? What is wrong with an answer that presents the attempts at reconciling this inconsistency by ...


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While not absolutely required, it is the preferred method of referencing sourced material. See the help center article on how to answer. When you find a useful resource that can help answer a question (from another site or in an answer on Christianity Stack Exchange) make sure you do all of the following: Provide a link to the original ...


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Yep, that answer is (well, was) definitely deserving of flags. Such an "answer" doesn't work well for this site for a number of reasons, such as: It doesn't provide the Catholic view of the legality of non-Catholic religions, and thus is "not an answer" It basically consists of a link to an external site, which we strongly discourage – while references are ...


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In most cases, if the question has great answers, it's probably because it was in response to a great question. However, it's possible for low-quality questions to have high-quality answers, and that would be a case where you probably wouldn't want to upvote the question. There's an intentionally small amount of guidance on when you should vote on posts, ...


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Abstract When someone's answer starts like this, I somehow have an increase in desire to continue reading. but when someones answer is like this. and it just kind of goes on and wanders for two or three sentences and then stops without coming to any definite end and is even a little insulting. I get a tad annoyed, I've even quite nearly downvoted an ...


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Welcome to Christianity.Stackexchange.com. Welcome and I hope that after you read this you will continue to want to participate. I welcome your post and your critiques, and would remind you that a lot of the policy that the moderators and community of this site enforce has been built on two years of meta discussion and argument. Firstly I'd like to address ...


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The system already does this, though there are a few things you can do in addition. First and foremost, every edit to a post, new answer to a question or several other actions will bump a post to the top of the home page. This means that everyone who visits that page will see your new post (and can navigate directly to the change by clicking the time stamp)....


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That's because there is an edit pending review. Until the edit is either accepted or rejected, further edits cannot be made.


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I think the addition is congruent with current site culture. I favor this improvement.


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We already have a strict policy that even your comments on the post cannot give advice: But can't I just say one thing? The site's official response to every pastoral advice question is "You should speak to a pastor, priest, spiritual counselor, etc. about such personal matters." Comments that do give advice typically end up deleted. Why should an ...


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The answer would have people going on a wild goose chase. It makes Catholisism out to have turned completely mystic, upholding other religions as true and one of the late Pope's to be the Antichrist. I realize it was an attempt to answer the question by pointing out a supposed premise flaw in your question (hence no mod deletion for being out of scope) it ...


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TL;DR No. This would be encouraging a class of question often referred to as a "list question", which is heavily discouraged. It also encourages voting wars, which is one of the principal things we aim to avoid by prohibiting "Truth questions." So rather than asking "Is Jesus eternally God?" then receiving 75 answers with vote ...


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It's a general StackExchange concept. The main site is for asking questions about the site's theme--Christianity, in this case. The meta site is for issues related to the site itself. For example, you seem to have the basic idea already. You asked this question here, and not on the main site, which is the right way to do it, because this is a question ...


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Deleting it does, indeed, erase those lost votes and you get your points back. Deleting answers that are deemed low quality by the community is also desirable in its own right. It helps keep the site clean from clutter. I do encourage you to go ahead and delete it, but if you want help in writing answers more effectively, and that will get up-votes ...


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Answers on this site need to address the original question. They can of course different ground than other answers –maybe hit on some things where other answers were weak– but they must actually answer the question. Sans any other answer, if the post does not stand alone as covering the scope of the question it shouldn't be posted as an answer.


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There is strong precedent on Stack Exchange sites for removing material that does not directly deal with the question. One specific subset of such material is addressed on Meta Stack Exchange: Should 'Hi', 'thanks', taglines, and salutations be removed from posts? Similar rationale applies here. In short, by focusing on answers, and not ...


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Tagging is to help find and sort questions - they should apply to the context of the question, questions themselves still have to have all the context in them. So, if I tag a question virgin-mary the question has to be about the Blessed Virgin Mary. That's easy. If I tag a question catholicism the question has to be about Catholicism, not just expected ...


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As a concession to your question's requested doctrinal framework, I'll keep this short and sweet. You've built your case on a false premise: Since at some level, Christianity.Stackexchange.com is about getting people interested in Christianity [...] That's not what we're here for. If it happens, it's incidental to a completely different focus on being a ...


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Guidelines and tips for posting answers Answer from the perspective of an outside observer, such as an archaeologist, historian, or other anthropologist about a denomination, a majority Christian belief, a respected and prominent Christian's statements, or Christian history. Find at least one relatively credible resource to support your answer before you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible