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I am asking about the original versions of these puns in here.

For example, to what is

He is the Alfa and the Romeo.

supposed to refer?

It refers to some verses in Revelation where God is referred to the Alpha and the Omega.

Another:

But God, in his Infiniti Mercedes, did Rolls away the Stanza.

Infinite Mercy...Roll away the Stone


Some of them are not well-known. For example:

Gearly beloved, we are Blazered here in the name of our Four-door, who art in Half-ton.

Attempted translation: Dearly beloved, we are (?) here in the name of our Father who art in Heaven

Is 'Blazered' supposed to be 'gathered'?

He ain't Chevy, he's my Beretta.

Beretta is maybe brother. What is Chevy supposed to be?


Also:

This is not a question about Christianity. As hilarious as this series of puns is, if you want to know what the author's inspiration for each pun was you should ask them not us. All we could do is speculate our way through the realm of somebody else's literary devices. – Caleb Dec 5 '15 at 8:52

What? A joke wouldn't really be funny to someone if that someone wouldn't get the joke, I believe. If you find 'He is the Alfa and the Romeo' funny, then I believe this is because you know Rev 22:13 or something related to Christianity. Even if Rev 22:13 is not what the author had in mind, I mean it's still something related to Christianity that would cause 'He is the Alfa and the Romeo' to be funny. I believe the author is not creating obscure references to Christianity for only the very highly learned to find humorous like Red Riding Hood's Gamma but is instead making obvious references to Christianity. Even if an answer is speculation or is not necessarily unique, any reference that can explain the joke should be allowed as answer, if the question is allowed to be posted, I guess.

Related:

What's up with churches and guitars in this joke from The Big Bang Theory?

https://judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/96796/whats-up-with-answering-questions-with-questions-in-this-joke-from-family-guy

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  • 2
    You might be able to ask on EL&U, but it seems like you've already got them all down. That makes it unclear what you are actually asking. You want to know if these are based off verses? Some liturgy? Their origin?
    – fгedsbend
    Dec 5 '15 at 17:48
  • @fredsbend Isaiah/David? loving kindness? gathered? Just those and I'm out
    – BCLC
    Dec 5 '15 at 17:50
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I don't think you can make it on-topic.

On-topic questions include those asking about

  • the history of denominations (such as Roman Catholic, Anglican, Church of Christ or Latter Day Saints) and movements (such as Pentecostalism, Creationism, Calvinism)
  • understanding the Bible from the perspective of a specific viewpoint (like those listed above)
  • explanations of the beliefs and practices of a denomination or movement
  • the Biblical basis for a belief or practice

Your question does not fall into one of those categories — not even the second, as it's not about understanding the Bible from the perspective of a specific viewpoint. It's about car marques, it's not about understanding the Bible.

Some questions just don't fit on any site within Stack Exchange. This is one of them.

4
  • Making puns is a practice?
    – BCLC
    Dec 5 '15 at 17:02
  • 3
    @BCLC Like I said, not a question about Christianity. It's a question about the anatomy of humor. Or about reading the original punster's mind. Either way it just isn't in scope here.
    – Caleb
    Dec 5 '15 at 17:30
  • @Caleb You put it on-hold for being opinion-based not off-topic. what is opinion-based about this question? I don't see how users' answers would differ by much
    – BCLC
    Dec 5 '15 at 17:40
  • 1
    @BCLC We have a limited selection of close reasons and the most-used off-topic explanations didn't apply very well, so I picked something that did. Second-guessing what some punster might have had in mind is definitely an opinion based thing, however obvious or subtle the answer may turn out to be. This is a variant on a "stump-the-chumps" question, only a single third party is the expert rather than yourself.
    – Caleb
    Dec 5 '15 at 18:18

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