5 replaced http://christianity.stackexchange.com/ with https://christianity.stackexchange.com/
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Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example herehere and more recently herehere.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

4 replaced http://meta.christianity.stackexchange.com/ with https://christianity.meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave herehere:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questionsFAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

3 added 273 characters in body
source | link

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
    • Emphasis on "friendly" Following the principles of the ["Summer of Love"][3]"Summer of Love".
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
    • Emphasis on "friendly" Following the principles of the ["Summer of Love"][3].
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

Pointing out false assumptions is a valid way to answer such questions. Example here and more recently here.

I agree that such questions are problematic, but there needs to be some balance and wisdom behind how we address individual cases.

  • As @fredsbend's post already addresses, we have our fair share of non-experts, and we can't simply expect everyone to know enough to ask good questions. We have to be willing to gently correct legitimate misunderstandings. It's an excellent opportunity to teach, and correct misconceptions.
  • On the other side of the coin, we occasionally get a new user that is simply trolling, and posting bad questions like that to "prove a point" or just to get a rise out of us. Such behavior is obviously not tolerated for long.
  • A third category is that individual that is honestly looking for answers, but refuses the help that the more experienced members try to give.

When it comes to determining the difference, it's sometimes obvious, and sometimes not. Usually the ones that are honestly confused will show that they are genuine by either accepting answers that correct their misunderstandings, or ask obviously genuine follow-up questions. Trolls just keep it up and the more we try to be patient and instructive, the worse they get.

When it comes to bad questions, particularly from new users that haven't had a chance to figure the site out yet, I still say to stick to the advice I gave here:

  • If we, who have been around the block for a while can lead by example it'll help.
  • Friendly comments to newcomers explaining the issue and pointing to the [FAQ] and FAQ questions can help as well.
  • Editing questions/answers to get them to fit the guidelines

As long as the person appears legitimately confused, and isn't obviously trolling or otherwise misbehaving, the best policy is to use the same advice we'd give a seeker in real life. Gently exhort, teach, instruct. If they then show themselves to be a troll, the response can change.

2 deleted 228 characters in body
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